Today on @ChosenGenerationRadio Ken Timmerman is a nationally recognized investigative reporter and war correspondent who was nominated for the Nobel Peace prize in 2006 for the work he has done to expose Iran’s nuclear weapons program. Prominently featured in the documentary, “Iranium,” Ken is one of the half-dozen true experts on the Islamic Republic of Iran in the U.S. today. Since 1995, he has run the Foundation for Democracy in Iran (iran.org) and regularly meets with Iranian dissidents overseas. He lectures on Iran at the Pentagon’s Joint Counter-Intelligence Training Academy, JCITA.

Eric Caron is a retired U.S. Diplomat, U.S. Special Agent, HSBC Middle East Bank Executive and author of SWITCHED ON – The Heart and Mind of a Special Agent. He is currently a security consultant and an analyst for Channel 7 News in Boston, Massachusetts. He is also an Adjunct Professor at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy on Cape Cod, where he teaches a course on How to Identify and Prevent Transnational Crime, and Cyber Security. We get his thoughts on the wall and the Presidents Emergency Powers declaration.

David Shestokas Constitutional and Trial Lawyer joins us to discuss the revelations this week that Andrew McCabe has said the DOJ and Rod Rosenstein had meetings to discuss the removal of the President using the 25th Amendment. This could be a treasonous act. We also discuss the provision in the new bill giving cities along the border who have a history of corruption with the Gulf Cartel being able to stop the building of the wall with funds in the bill. Does that effect the use of funds through Emergency Powers.

Brandon Darby is the managing director and editor-in-chief of Breitbart Texas. He co-founded the Cartel Chronicles project with Ildefonso Ortiz and Stephen K. Bannon. Brandon discusses the provision that gives amnesty to potential drug dealers and gang and cartel members. Also the use of fentanyl added to marijuana by the Mexicans to boost the potency has led to massive deaths. How a wall and other security measures are needed with policy changes.